‘I think an interesting work should have multiple ways of interpreting it and it is also open ended. ‘

Born 1982, Shenyang, Liaoning Province. Lives and works in Shenyang.

Although Geng Yini is not especially fond of the term ‘post-internet artist’, her work combines the traditions of oil painting that she studied at the Lu Xun Academy with the virtual world we now inhabit, jumping from screen to screen, and online window to window. Her large figurative paintings feature often disjunctive combinations of images drawn from eclectic online sources: snapshots, advertising and fine art images jostle against each other to unsettling effect, creating ambiguous narratives. Painting very fast, working spontaneously, she combines elements from different cultures and historical periods, and from high art and popular culture, in order to construct uncanny scenarios that collage real and imaginary people, landscapes and events. She says the long winters in the rather bleak industrial city of Shenyang result in her spending all day every day painting in her studio, creating her uncanny worlds on canvas. Brutal Kariru (2015) depicts a small masked figure – a child? – wielding an axe in a Gothic cathedral. The words ‘Bang Bang Bang’ are scrawled across the canvas. The title is no less absurd: ‘Kariru’ is actually a Japanese word meaming ‘to rent’ or ‘to borrow’, but Geng intended it as a mispronunciation of the English word ‘calories’, Geng’s way of pointing out the absurd misunderstandings that can result from ‘second-hand’ data, but also its potential to create something new and exciting.

 

 



 

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