“In digital terms, visual images and sound can both be converted into numbers (0s and 1s). [Both] can be recorded, broadcast, and synthesized … edited and modulated.”

Born 1969, Taipei, Taiwan

Wang Fu-Jui lives in a large and crowded city where noise continues all day and night. Where many Taipei residents simply endure the din, he enjoys it. And as if the endless clamour of traffic, garbage cans, people, alarms, and phones is not enough for him, he has become a connoisseur of inaudible noise as well—the distant remnants of ordinary sounds, and the pings and hums of antennas, computers, radios, card readers and all the other devices on which modern urban life depends. In works like Electromagnetic Soundscape (2012) and Sound Bulb (2008), he invites the rest of us to take out our ear plugs and share the music that his ingeniously programmed “orchestras” of microphones, speakers, and amplifiers summon from the ether. We may not become as static-happy as Wang Fu-Jui is, but experiencing the beauty in what we usually dismiss as buzz does give pause for thought.



 

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